Baby Massage & The Power of Touch

 

 

Baby massage is a very special art of using nurturing touch to communicate with your baby to share loving touch in a non-judgmental and calm environment. Massage touch helps baby to feel safe and secure in their new world.

 

It’s a wonderful time for connecting with each other allowing opportunity to take time out and be with baby.

 

Parents massage their own babies using very specially designed series of strokes. These strokes combine Indian and Swedish massage along with reflexology and yoga all designed to be beneficial for babies.

 

Benefits for Baby

• Builds immunity

• Relieves colic wind and constipation

• Enhances bonding and secure attachment

• Excellent for early language and communication and promotes non-verbal communication by watching and responding to baby’s cues during the massage – watching what baby is saying with their body:

                        – Hands across chest may indicate ‘I have had enough’

                         – Facial expressions are very good indicators

 

Baby massage is so much more than a series of strokes. It’s an incredible powerful tool which supports the parent/baby relationship enabling communication and connection through the power of touch benefiting the physiological and psychological level of baby.

 

The power of touch is critical to our well-being and all our senses rely on touch for growth and development

 

Benefits for Parents

• Improves confidence in early months

• A chance to meet other like-minded parents where lots of advice and generally parenting is shared.

• Most of all, it’s enjoyable

 

Life is very busy and this short time at Baby Massage Class allows for positive interaction followed by a cuppa.

 

By Bridget Grimes

 

 

Bridget holds Baby Massage Classes in The Down Syndrome Centre, 3-4 times a year.

 

Bridget is an experienced nurse who has specialised in early intervention for children with Down syndrome. Bridget worked with Carmona Services for over 30 years, where she supported parents in the family home providing support and guidelines in early development, in conjunction with a multi- disciplinary team. She went on to study and qualify in Baby Massage in 2006 in which she has an internationally recognised qualification, and has been working in this area for the last twelve years.

 

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